High Payoff Actions: Beyond The Comfort Zone

High Payoff Actions: Beyond the Comfort ZoneWe talked in a PREVIOUS POST about how in order to be successful, we as mompreneurs need to learn to recognize when comfort is driving the choices we make.  Staying comfortable, or in our comfort zones, is something we all struggle with as we juggle all the responsibilities of business and family life.  Well, today we’re going to talk about making that shift to basing our choices on our goals, which are rooted in the values, priorities and vision we’re committed to.  I like to refer to these choices as “high payoff actions,” or HPAs.  HPAs utilize your top moneymaking talents and your very best gifts, deserve your utmost attention, and result in you creating the opportunity and life that you want.

 

Let me give you some examples of what I consider high payoff actions:

 

Directly asking a client to hire you.

Creating a service or product to market to your clients.

Making a follow-up call to someone who has already expressed interest. 

Fulfilling a customer order or completing a customer project. 

Researching your niche market for awesome ideas to emulate. 

 

I would suggest that you aim to do between one to three HPAs each day, at the beginning of the day.  Do what’s most important first, and don’t allow yourself to get distracted along the way by something easier or by what we sometimes refer to as “bright, shiny objects.”  Sure, it’s interesting, but it’s not necessarily going to help grow your business.  Sure, it’s comfortable, but if you’re feeling too comfortable, take a look at your day and be sure you’re incorporating some of these high payoff actions that will ultimately drive you toward success.

 

Now I know that some of you are squirming right now, and if you are, that’s a really good indicator that you’ve probably identified an HPA worth doing.  Some momentary discomfort is so worth it, girls.  You are choosing to act on your goals, deliberately and intentionally, in order to grow, and that’s the reward!  And the really cool thing is that every time you grow outside your comfort zone, you are effectively pushing those boundaries outward to increase the total area of what will feel comfortable to you in the future.  Each time you try something new or accomplish something bigger, you make that circle wider.  So what feels uncomfortable in the beginning will feel successful later, and how sweet that success is!

 

I love to hear from you, so leave me a comment!

What “bright, shiny objects” pull your attention away from high payoff actions? 

What HPA really makes you squirm?  How can you incorporate that into your day? 

 

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Your kids are watching you

I saw a quote on twitter this week that gave me a great reminder about something I think needs repeating (often):

Don’t worry that children never listen to you; worry that they are always watching you.  ~Robert Fulghum

OK, so I regularly question my kids’ hearing since I find I have to repeat myself a thousand times if I expect them to act on the things I say: “Turn off the DS. Wash your hands. Set the table.” Yeah. Apparently they don’t hear commands so well.

So they may not be listening to me, but I know for sure they’re watching me.

Here is some proof I know they’ve been keeping an eye on me:

  • My seven-year-old son offered to help my three-year-old daughter use the bathroom. (I resisted the urge to direct or monitor him, strong as it was.)
  • My daughter was overheard yelling at her dolls: “I’m sick of it! I can’t take it anymore!” (Not a terribly proud parenting moment for me.)
  • My six-year-old son was telling his brother that he wanted to be an entrepreneur when he grows up, so he could like his job. (Imagine my pride.)
  • I overheard my daughter “reading” one of my business cards to herself: “Mom Business Coach. Mommy is the best business coach.” (I had no idea she had a clue what was on those cards, nor that she had noticed them before, nor that she knew my job title. Not that she has any idea what that means, but it’s clear she has noticed the cards and watched enough of what I do to learn that they are related to my business.)

These are just a few of the examples that come to mind from this week. Clearly, some of what they pick up from watching me is positive, and some of what they learn from me is less so. I accept that I’m imperfect and do the best I can to model the things I most want them to learn.

What are your children learning from watching you?  Take a moment to reflect on this. Is there anything you see them doing that you can celebrate as a job well done? And what do you see that you want to model differently?

In my next post, I’ll share some of the values that I most want to model for my kids. I’d love to hear what you’re trying to teach yours!

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The Toughest Question Working Moms Face

 

Guest post by Michele Dortch of IntegratedMother.com

What do you do?What do you do?

It’s a simple question that comes up frequently for business women. Yet motherhood makes the answer complex.

Before children, you probably responded to this question with your career profession, “I’m an HR Manager.” Once children enter the picture, your heart wants to lead with, “I’m a mother,” but your head advises you to lead with something perceived as more credible first, especially if you’re at a business function.

If you’re like most success-driven women, you want to make a contribution to something meaningful. You also closely attribute what you do to your significance and importance. Becoming a mother complicates what you perceive as important – my career or my children? As a result the simple question, “What do you do?” transforms into the more difficult question, “Who are you?”

The transition from working woman to working mother is a period of significant change, yet few women recognize the change or actively do anything to bridge the gap between the two phases of life. Somewhere in between meaning, significance and importance is lost making the new question, “Who are you?” harder to answer.

The key to understanding the importance of knowing who you are can be explained by considering a metaphor; your life is like a computer.

When you first bought your computer, it was installed with a specific operating system (OS) as well as a variety of software applications. Technology advances rapidly, so before you know it you have to upgrade to a new OS to run new software applications, otherwise the computer will crash. This is exactly how motherhood works.

Before children, you operated from a specific set of values and beliefs (your OS) and pursued certain life goals (your software applications). You found confidence, importance and significance because new goals were handled by your OS with ease. Then one day, you added a radically new software application (children) and this required a major upgrade to your OS. But, you got busy and forgot to upgrade, so today you’re running on a patched up OS that’s often buggy and experiences full-system crashes periodically.

Sound familiar? If so, it’s time to upgrade your OS. Here are some basic steps to get you started:

  • Clarify your values and beliefs. What are the 3-5 words or short phrases that describe who you are? If you’re having trouble determining your values, ask people around you for 3-5 words or short phrases that describe you.
  • Establish your mission. A personal mission is a statement of purpose that provides direction and clarifies your reason for being. It’s a must-have for all working moms.
  • Beta test and work out the bugs. Begin to actively use your mission statement. The ideal approach is to use it as a planning tool. As you plan your week, focus on activity that is aligned with your mission.

Once you complete these steps you’ll be well on your way toward upgrading your OS and before long, you’ll find greater ease and confidence answering the question, “What do you do?”

 

http://www.integratedmother.com/blog/the-toughest-question-working-moms-face/

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